team

Helena Machado
Principal investigator

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Helena Machado specializes in the ethical and sociological challenges emerging from the uses of genetics in contemporary modes of governance of criminality. She is the author (with Barbara Prainsack) of Tracing Technologies: Prisoners’ Views in the Era of CSI (Ashgate, 2012), a work that discusses how convicted offenders understand crime scene technologies and large police databases. She has also written extensively about public attitudes toward forensic genetic technologies. Her current research critically engages STS, bioethics, sociological and criminological perspectives to explore the collective identities and geopolitics emerging from the transnational sharing of DNA data in the EU.

Rafaela Granja
Post-doctoral researcher

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Rafaela Granja’s current research explores the interconnections between family, genetics, technology and crime. Her research goal is to understand how familial searching is being framed in different EU countries. In particular, she seeks to analyse the biosocial implications of integrating biological traces in a socio-technical network that materialises genetic associations between individuals. Issues such as the ‘geneticisation’ of social bonds, the consolidation of links between family and criminality and the exacerbation of social inequalities are her main focus.

TBT
Post-doctoral researcher

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TBT


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Nina Amelung
Post-doctoral researcher

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Nina Amelung’s current research investigates the democratic challenges of cross-border biometric data-exchange. Her interest lies in public controversies and public involvement related to forensic DNA technologies across the European Union. In particular, she focuses on how controversies evolve and are shaped in different countries. Furthermore, she explores the making of ‘silenced publics’ in European crime and border control regimes which use DNA or fingerprint data.

Filipa Queirós
Junior researcher

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Filipa Queirós is a Ph.D. student in Sociology at the University of Coimbra. Her work explores the conceptions of the body that emerge from the development of recent forensic DNA technologies. In particular, she investigates phenotypical inference and its developments and impact in the forensic field, not only within the context of cross-border criminal investigation, but also with regards to new forms of human identity related to suspect population and, broadly, to transnational suspects.

Marta Martins
Junior researcher

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Marta Martins is a Ph.D. student in the program of Sociology at University of Minho. Focusing on discourse analysis of forensic geneticists and the media portraits and approaches, her research is based on the study of transnational criminal cases for which genetic data was used under the Prüm Decisions.

Sara Matos
Junior researcher

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Sara Matos is currently enrolled in the PhD program of Sociology at University of Minho. Her research explores issues related to the protection of genetic data in the cross-border exchange of DNA profiles. In particular, she maps the regulatory regime for data protection in the EU with a specific comparative focus at the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal and the UK.

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